Skip to main content

Pause Ponder and Pun


Another Wednesday, another picture of silly women in odd clothes, hanging out together. And I don't think it's a Tupperware party.

So you tell me what you think's going on here.

Don't "waist" a minute.

We'll see you back here Saturday.

Bye for now.

Comments

00dozo said…
Aspiring supermodels of the 1930's.
00dozo said…
The inspiration for Jello's 'jiggle and wiggle' advertising campaign.
Quirkyloon said…
Hey what's up with the pizza spam?

hee hee

Is that spam pizza? Ha!

"You put the wiggle here, you put the jiggle out, you put the wiggle and it gets shaken all about! You do the Jiggle Pokey and it turns you all around...that's what it's all about! clap, clap"

hee hee
Aspiring inventor Jeff Fitzsimmons lost several thousand dollars trying to market his "Tandem Bungee Belt."
renalfailure said…
Penny Marshall cut this scene out of A League of Their Own for reasons that are all too obvious...
Don said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
Don said…
Getting ready to shoot the original chariot race scene in the movie Ben Hur.
Canadian Blend said…
I've no idea what's going on, but a friend of mine had one of those gizmos in college (c. 1982). As I recall it made a lot of noise and made her hard to understand when she tried to talk while using it.
Don said…
A group of ladies doing their belly exercises on a machine that was common in it's time for "reducing body fat" by vibration. Didn't do much though, but was a big fad for a while.
Tgoette said…
A scene from the Adult Diaper testing lab.
For some reason I keep thinking of vibrators when I see that photo. So in order to keep your blog's G-rating intact, maybe I shouldn't play along today. - G
Leeuna said…
"The FDA recently approved the use of the belt sander as a tool for waist reduction. Side effects may include blood and tissue loss and extreme pain. May cause scarring."
Ziva said…
Ladies syncronized bondage - it's all in the matching outfits.

Popular posts from this blog

Tales From The Supermarket

Bob and Brenda worked in the supermarket. They weren't check-out clerks. And they weren't stock-boys. Brenda sure wasn't. And they weren't employees who worked in the fish section or the deli. No. They were on the shelves.

They hadn't been on the shelves very long but in that short time they'd developed a considerably close friendship.

The chatted all day when the store was busy and at night when the store was closed. They talked about everything. The talked about what raw products they came from. The talked about their manufacturing processes. And they talked about the long routes in semi-trailers that brought them to this store.

Oddly enough the one thing they never made clear to one another was just what product each of them was.

One day when Brenda was commenting on their friendship she told Bob she was grateful for their amity. "Are you Tea?" said Bob, pekoe-ing her way. "I thought I was Tea". You're coffee!"

This week's Tw…

My Back Pages - November

I read five books last month bringing my year to date total to 61, well past the 50 I estimated at the beginning of the year. And I've yet to get through December.

The month started out with The Nix, the debut novel by Nathan Hill which has been receiving a lot off positive reviews. In it Hill flips back and fourth from the 1968 Chicago protests and 2011 in a desperate search for the truth behind why his mother abandoned him at an early age. In between Hill takes on politics, the media and addiction as well as other aspects of society. It's a well-spun tale and I quite enjoyed reading it.

Next up was the auto-biographical I Am Brian Wilson of Beach Boys fame. This was somewhat of a scattered affair but an interesting read nonetheless. Wilson - or his ghostwriter - however is no Hemingway.

Then it was on to one of my favourite authors, Ian Rankin and his latest tale of now retired Inspector John Rebus, Rather Be The Devil. I never tire of these stories and this is the 21st in …