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Down The Rabbit Hole


The best way to describe what I experienced the other night is this reference from Alice in Wonderland. I really know of no other way to explain it. After 6 weeks of chemo, the effects of the drugs have expanded beyond the insomnia on the days immediately following my chemo to vivid dreams, almost bordering on hallucinations later in the week. I think the sustained toxicity of these chemicals is starting to have an impact.

I take my chemo drugs on Monday. Usually, Monday and Tuesday nights I have difficulty sleeping. This week when I hit Wednesday I was pretty tired. I had chills, so early in the evening I put on my pajamas and settled down on the couch, under a blanket to watch TV. Come 9 o'clock I was off to bed. I slept in fits and starts. I awoke at 11. Again at 12:30. Then once more around 2 a.m. Then around 4 and again about 6 and I finally got up about 7. It was a rough night. I tossed and turned...and dreamed.

And boy, this was better than going to the movies. Weird, freaky stuff...entertaining to be sure.

Where the inspiration for these dreams came from, I don't know. But it made me wonder if Lewis Carrol ever underwent chemotherapy.

Say, before I let you go, did you know the difference between an oral and rectal thermometer?

The taste!

Comments

Anonymous said…
"One pill makes you larger
And one pill makes you small"

"Feed your head
Feed your head
Feed your head"

Darn chemo! I'm sorry you're suffering from imsomnia, but hopefully you're not puking up your guts as well.

There, there Noname! Remember: feed your head.

hee hee


word veri: gratirs
CatLadyLarew said…
So THAT's how you get all the great ideas for blog posts. Chemo-hallucinations! (Explains a lot about the Quirkster, too... she says with love.)

Sending healing thoughts your way!
nonamedufus said…
Quirks: It's fascinating to track the impacts of the drugs. Yee-ha! No throwing up yet. I doubt it'll be as fascinating then. Hmm...
nonamedufus said…
Cat Lady: Damn, my secret's out.
Don said…
Sorry about the sleep issues. I hate those nights, and they will wear on a soul for sure. As far as Alice in Wonderland and Lewis Carrol goes, from the first time I ever read that story I swore Carrol slipped into Edgar Allen Poe's heroin stash.
nonamedufus said…
Don: I think you may be right, Don *he said sleepily*.
Anonymous said…
Good Lord - they came up with a way to reach Mars, and to cure so many things. It is totally asinine that they haven't figured out how to cure cancer without killing us off in the process. Chemo is so bad for cancer AND the rest of your body...

Tylenol PM helps me sleep when I'm up, but I'm sure they have you on all sorts of things.

Hugs and positive thoughts!

Ms. Thirty Something
nonamedufus said…
Ms 30?: Thanks for the kind words. I appreciate it.

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