Skip to main content

30M2DW III - Day Whatever


Shakespearean English

I slipped into the Twelfth Night Pub unobserved and thought to myself "Hmm, what a coincidence. The Twelfth night and this was the 16th night I'd been on the case." Cops weren't always the most accurate of people but, hey, close enough.

I parked myself in one of the darkest, deepest recesses of the bar and sat with my back to the wall so as to observe the comings and goings.

"What be your pleasure, my liege" boomed a voice in my ear. It was the barkeep, a swarthy looking fellow in what looked like knickerbockers and long stockings, shoes with silver buckles and a frilly shirt like in that Seinfeld episode.

I immediately thought of Dylan, but of course that wasn't the pleasure little Lord Fauntleroy was referring to.

"A whiskey with a Pabst chaser, and keep 'em coming."

"Forsooth, my lord has a liking for the spirits" claimed LLF.

"I don't know about your four suits but four Pabsts sounds about right."

He disappeared behind the bar and went to work on my order. I thought to myself "Gee, this guy's striving for authenticity in the Twelfth Night Bar speaking Shakespearean English and all. I'm sure glad I wasn't sent to a Chaucer Pub.

I could see out the large front window that a long, sleek, jet-black Cadillac was pulling into the parking lot. It's headlamps cut a swath across the dark interior of the bar.

Some wag at the bar shouted "Hark, what light through yonder window breaks?"

LLF was just about to chime in when I saw for myself who was entering the bar. It was him. Horse face.

LLF turned to my man and inquired: "My lord, perchance thou might share with me why the long visage?"

Prithee search out We Work For Cheese if thee feign any interest at all in this day's prompt.

Comments

Cheryl said…
I'm far too tired to write a witty comment but I did want to let you know I've finally gotten around to reading the first 16 days of your hard-boiled detective novel and I like it. I especially liked Day 3. I'm concerned that you're not going to solve the case in the next 12 days and I'll be left hanging wondering who done it.
nonamedufus said…
Rest assured, Cheryl, Gouda always finishes what he starts. You don't think I'd write for 28 days and not end this bloody thing?
Cadeaux said…
Oh...see...you are doing what I'm not doing...other than writing witty stuff...I don't look at the next day's prompt until I go to write it at about 5:00 a.m. And, it's a "puffy" shirt, dammit. And they have it at the Smithsonian Institute...and I took a photo of it when my daughter went on her 8th grade field trip - um - about five years ago. :)
nonamedufus said…
Yes you're absolutely right. It was a puffy shirt. Sometimes Gouda makes mistakes. I guess we'd call him a bad cheese.
ReformingGeek said…
I have a liking for this one. Most Goudath.

May the horse be with you.
Cheryl said…
I hadn't thought THAT part through. :D
mike said…
I'm thinking I'd rather chase Pabst with whiskey, but that's just me.
Cadeaux said…
I hope Gouda knows I was just yanking his chain a little. ;)
Linda R. said…
Thou art witty, indeed. Draw thyself a draught and quench thy thirst.
nonamedufus said…
Gouda likes to have his chain yanked now and then.
nonamedufus said…
What do you call an Italian single dessert? Oh-be-one-cannolli.
nonamedufus said…
I'm really confused on this. I don't drink boilermakers but when I had the whiskey chasing the beer someone told me it was the other way around.
nonamedufus said…
Ale's well that ends well.
frankleemeidere said…
Old jokes in older English. I like.
nonamedufus said…
Frank, you have such a way with words/
"Some wag at the bar shouted "Hark, what light through yonder window breaks?"






LLF was just about to chime in when I saw for myself who was entering the bar. It was him. Horse face.





LLF turned to my man and inquired: "My lord, perchance thou might share with me why the long visage?"

HA HA HA HA HA THESE WERE AMAZING!!!
nonamedufus said…
Even Shakespeare can have a sense of humour around here.
Linda Medrano said…
Go home to Dylan and see how she likes the rhetoric. You may be relieved of a romantic entanglement by morning if you want to know the truth.
nonamedufus said…
Hey, Gouda's on a case here. I know all work and no play makes Jack (Gouda) a dull boy but we all have to make sacrifices, right?
KZ said…
I knew you wouldn't be able to resist the old "long face" routine! I'm glad that finally paid off.
nonamedufus said…
I had to work it in. Are you kidding?
meleahrebeccah said…
"I parked myself in one of the darkest, deepest recesses of the bar and sat with my back to the wall so as to observe the comings and goings."

That is ALWAYS where I sit inside restaurants / bars. I have to see who's coming and going!

And I cannot wait to see what happens with Horse Face next!
nonamedufus said…
I didn't know you were an investigator. That's where they all sit. I'm surprised I didn't bump into you back there.

Popular posts from this blog

My Back Pages - November

I read five books last month bringing my year to date total to 61, well past the 50 I estimated at the beginning of the year. And I've yet to get through December.

The month started out with The Nix, the debut novel by Nathan Hill which has been receiving a lot off positive reviews. In it Hill flips back and fourth from the 1968 Chicago protests and 2011 in a desperate search for the truth behind why his mother abandoned him at an early age. In between Hill takes on politics, the media and addiction as well as other aspects of society. It's a well-spun tale and I quite enjoyed reading it.

Next up was the auto-biographical I Am Brian Wilson of Beach Boys fame. This was somewhat of a scattered affair but an interesting read nonetheless. Wilson - or his ghostwriter - however is no Hemingway.

Then it was on to one of my favourite authors, Ian Rankin and his latest tale of now retired Inspector John Rebus, Rather Be The Devil. I never tire of these stories and this is the 21st in …

My Back Pages - 2016

Here, as promised is a month-by-month breakdown of the 67 books I delved into this year. I got off to a strong start and then my intake dwindled for a couple of months until picking back up in April. I'll let you in on my favourites at the end of this list.

January

Here, There and Everywhere:
My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles - Geoff Emerick - ****
H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald - ***
Close To The Edge - The Story of Yes - Chris Welch - ***
Sweet Caress - William Boyd - ****


February

Purity by Jonathan Franzen 
Still Alice by Lisa Genova.


March

Natchez Burning - Greg Iles
The Promise (Elvis Cole #20) - Robert Crais

April

The Snowman (Harry Hole)- Joe Nesbo ****
Phantom (Harry Hole) - Joe Nesbo ****
The Leopard (Harry Hole) - Jo Nesbo ****


May

George Harrison Reconsidered ***
The Heart Goes Last - Margaret Atwood ****
Dropping The Needle - The Vinyl Dialogues Volume II ***
The Electric Mist with the Confederate Dead, (Dave Robicheaux #6) - James Lee Burke****


June/.July

 Lust and Wonder - Aug…

Traveling Along Singing A Song

Pete and Paulie were strolling along one day. The sun was bright, the air was cool, the birds chirped crazily in the trees and the squirrels  munched merrily on their nuts. Well not their nuts exactly. Nuts they found on the ground and in the gardens in the park.

Paulie felt so good he began to whistle. It wasn't any tune in particular, just one of those annoyingly tuneless whistles that wandered all over the place. Pete looked at Paulie and he squiggled up his nose and he said "What the hell is that?" Paulie replied "Oh nothing in particular. I'm just happy." "But you're not even whistling a tune" said Pete. Paulie replied "If you're so wise I'd like to see you do better, Pete."

Pete went silent for a moment and seemed to mumble to himself for a moment or two. Then he cleared his throat with a little cough, he opened his mouth and he began to sing.


"There once was a king very wise
Who spoke to his enemies in disguise
T…