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30M2DW III - Day 13


Incommunicado

As I drove out of my whey to the Cheese Store and my meeting with Chief Silver I started humming a little tune that had been rumbling around in my head. Soon, the hum turned to words…

On a tree by a river a little tom Tit,
Sang; "Willow, tit-willow, tit-willow".
And I said to him; "dickie-bird why do you sit,
singing willow, tit-willow, tit-willow?"
"Is it weakness of intellect, birdie" I cried,
"or a rather tough worm in your little insides?"
With a shake of his poor little head he decried;

"Oh willow, tit-willow, tit-willow.

You really had to hand it to Gilbert and Sullivan. They had a real turn of phrase and the Incommunicado was one of my favourite G&S works.

Anyway this little ear worm helped pass the time as I made my way to the precinct. I found Silver alone in his office pushing his furniture around.

"What are you doing?" I asked.

"I'm tired of how this place looks. I'm rearranging the furniture" said Silver.

"So I guess, then, you're the lone arranger" I quipped. "Hi-yo, Silver" I added for good measure.

"Look, Jack, cheese" I thought he was one-upping me but sure enough on his desk was an elaborate  cheese plate.

"Gouda, eh" he said. Now I was sure he was having me on but I let Silver ride. 

I explained my theory about horse chest maybe being a horse face.

"I like it" he said. "Thanks for trotting it out. The lads upstairs may think it's a load of crop and you'll likely stirrup trouble but I'm giving you my unbridled support, Gouda. I'm behind you all the way."

"After having eaten all this cheese, I'm not sure that's where you wanna be but thanks for your support, Chief," I snorted.

It felt good to be back in the saddle. This case was no cinch but I felt I was a bit further ahead than before. Now if I could just keep up the pace I was sure I could rein in the killer in no time. Of course I kept this all to my self because I thought it best to exercise tack.

Check out all the tit willows at We Work For Cheese and how they wrote about today's prompt which by the way wasn't The Mikado.





Comments

Cheryl P. said…
Lone Arranger? Gouda one, Dufus.
nonamedufus said…
I couldn't resist.
nonamedufus said…
And that's no bull, Linda.
Linda Medrano said…
Now I'm getting confused. Does that happen to you too? I'm sailing along thinking I've got it and then wham! What saddle? "Back in the saddle..." What saddle? What did I miss?
frankleemeidere said…
While I canter argue with the equine puns, the Gilbert and Sullivan "Incommunicado" is the one that really caught me.
meleahrebeccah said…
"Lone Arranger" - SLAYED ME! Ha!!
nonamedufus said…
Oh, canter, good one. I was particularly proud of the Gilbert and Sullivan Incommunicado. Thanks, Frank.
nonamedufus said…
Do you know where the Lone Arranger takes his garbage? To da dump to da dump to da dump dump dump.
meleahrebeccah said…
BahaHHAhHAhhAHhAHHA!!!
Back in the saddle... Loved that!!!
ReformingGeek said…
Oh my, I'm in pun heaven....or in the desert on a horse with no name....with an ear worm.

It just gets more weird as I go. I'm leaving now.
mikewjattoomanymornings said…
I've seen so many horse puns in one place, and you have to remember that I live in the city that hosts North America's second-largest rodeo. You make me smile, NoName.
nonamedufus said…
By George I think she's got it.
nonamedufus said…
Is the largest the Calgary Stampede?
Whenever I hear "back in the saddle", I think of the old Firesign Theatre parody... the best, by far!
I'm only here to stirrup trouble.
nonamedufus said…
Never saw that one, Paula.
nonamedufus said…
Oh, Paula, you're full of crop.
Margaret said…
I don't know if I can stand all these puns - ack!
nonamedufus said…
Aw, c'mon Margaret. I've tried to pace myself.
KZ said…
Word of the day: Puntastic. :)
nonamedufus said…
Well, thank you sir.
Ziva said…
Wow, Dufus, you've outdone yourself with the horse puns on this one. You are the master.
nonamedufus said…
Yes, there's a certain equine-imity about this post don't you think?

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