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Taking Care of Lil' Man

I don't usually do book reviews. I read books and sometimes I like 'em and sometimes I don't. Then I move on to the next one. But blogging buddy Jeremy Bell from We Took the Bait, recently asked me if I'd read and review his book. And in a moment of weakness, I said yes.



Jeremy and his wife Jessica became new and foster parents last summer. And they took time off from their blog to raise the new addition to their family. Jeremy even wrote about the experience. And the result is the humorous Taking Care of Lil' Man.

In a series of funny vignettes and accompanying drawings by Dennis Cobourn one gets a quick idea of how challenging, yet rewarding Jeremy's experience as a new dad has been. For example, let me share one of my favourite vignettes by means of illustration:

Day 10 -- We were driving along with Lil' Man, and came to a stoplight 
facing a gas station displaying the time and temperature on digital readout. 
96 degrees. From the backseat we heard the sound of wind breaking, 
followed by a burst of giggles. Looked up at the temperature readout. 97 degrees. 
Way to destroy the ozone layer, Big Guy...

Funny, how in a series of short, succinct and funny vignettes we get an excellent idea of how Jeremy's life has changed after having a two year-old thrown at him. Well, not literally. That'd be cruel and probably grounds for charges being brought against him.

Another vignette I really like, goes like this:

Day Twenty-three -- Part of my breakfast this morning was a 
Boston cream doughnut with all the chocolate frosting strategically removed 
and replaced with Lil' Man saliva. 
All in all not bad... Though I'd have preferred chocolate.

Jeremy must have listened to his mother growing up when she said "waste not want not".

This little gem is a great quick read. It's quite funny the way Jeremy lets us in on his world and his new adventure with an adopted son. I can't wait for volume two when the little guy can talk! 

So, Jeremy, I enjoyed your book. You made me laugh at your predicaments. And if others want a good snicker at your expense they should hunt down your collection of vignettes where it's exclusively available at Amazon.com. 

This is not a paid endorsement.

Unfortunately.

Comments

quirkyloon said…
How sweeeeet! Congrats to Jeremy and especially to Lil Man for truly finding his forever family.

*smile*
nonamedufus said…
It's a cute and funny book. Glad you liked the review.
00dozo said…
That would explain the absence of Jeremy and Jessica. They finally 'took the bait', so to speak. Congrats to them!

Noticed how you zeroed in on the 'gas-persion' part of the book. Heh, heh.
nonamedufus said…
Yep, J & J have been a little preoccupied lately. Now we know why.
Nicky said…
Ahhh, the joys of parenting. I could some very similar stories. Of course, most of the ones about gas are about Jepeto, but other than that...

:-)
nonamedufus said…
Sounds like Jepeto and Jeremy's little one have a lot in common.

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