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30 Days of Photos - #16 - Ordinary Matters


Welcome to 30 Days of Photos, where 18 bloggers are participating in posting a photo a day for 30 days. Here are the other 17 you can visit after you've been here:



If you're a regular follower of my blog you'll know that last month I spent 2 weeks in Panama, mostly golfing and imbibing a Balboa or Corona or two on my brother-in-law's balcony. But there were days we ventured out of the tranquility of the Bijao Beach and Golf complex such as the day we headed out to El Valle to take in the sights and visit the local zoo.

This is the church in El Valle, presumably built many years ago. It has a simplicity yet beauty about it. I'm not a church-goer, but I was attracted to this temple of worship. The majority of Panamanians, by the way, are Catholic.

The church may appear ordinary to a passerby, but to Panamanians in El Valle ordinary matters.

Comments

Ziva said…
Oh yes, sometimes, ordinary definitely matters. What a wonderful take on the theme, dufus. And to me, that church doesn't seem ordinary at all, our churches all look very different from that one. ;)
nonamedufus said…
You know for all its simplicity in design I was still struck by how impressive this church was. Here's a shot of the interior...
I'm not seeing the shot of the interior. :( But nice take on the theme, nonetheless.
nonamedufus said…
That's odd. It's there. I see it.
Linda Medrano said…
I'm not religious, but I love churches. I find them to be really charming for the most part. I love the old Spanish missions in California with the graveyards attached. The architecture of churches can be so calming. It's the people doing the preaching that I object to in most cases. Great photo!
meleahrebeccah said…
Ooooooooh, pretty! It really DOES has a simplicity AND beauty about it.
mikewjattoomanymornings said…
Great post, NoName. I love the interior and exterior shots you posted here. There's something about these old Catholic churches that I find very appealing, but I don't know what it is. They often feel very much like I think church ought to feel, somehow.
Cheryl P. said…
Great picture, Dufus! There is a real beauty in that church. What could be quite ordinary (to those that live there and are used to it) can also be viewed as extraordinary by those of us out here that find it beautiful.
Hmm, not a particularly ordinary-looking church to Brits, but hey, I expect you weren't talking about us...

My favourite part of this photo is the bench, with its motley crew and bicycle. Life, caught not doing much, bicycle, caught not doing much, delightful.
nonamedufus said…
One day I'd like to see those old spanish missions in California. I agree with you about those doing the preaching, Linda. I love that quote that goes: "Going to church does not make you a Christian any more than going to a garage makes you a car."
nonamedufus said…
It really does. It's kind of spartan yet serene.
nonamedufus said…
I think you've hit the nail on the head, Mike. They're a far cry from those luxurious, ornate, and expensive shrines we're so used to seeing.
nonamedufus said…
Absolutely, Cheryl. I just loved stopping for a few minutes to wander around this place. It was simple, the grounds well-kept. All in all an amazing sight.
nonamedufus said…
That's the locals finding shade. It's hot in Panama - was close to 40C when I was there - and everywhere you go local folks were taking up whatever shade was available. That's the same day we traipsed around the zoo for a couple of hours. I stopped along the way several times when I found some shade...but there wasn't much.
Nicky said…
I think it's more a case of understated elegance than ordinary. It's very pretty, Dufus, and very inviting.
nonamedufus said…
You may be right, Nicky. But we didn't have a category for understated elegance.
00dozo said…
The church almost looks like a wall facade, something that would be built for a movie set. But as churches go and religion being such an everyday part of Panamanian life, it suits the theme well. Nice shot, dufus.

;-)
nonamedufus said…
It does, doesn't it. A title reminiscent of the Alamo maybe. Here's another angle...
laughing mom said…
I think what makes this shot extra-ordinary are the people in the front. I love that you included them rather than try to get an angle that excluded them.
nonamedufus said…
Well they weren't going anywhere. I don't now how I could have excluded them. They have a way of making the church a real part of the community; of their lives don't they?
Kristen said…
That is a beautiful church. There are so many things about it that are awesome. The "white." ... nothing is ever still white here. The design. The simplicity. Beautiful.
nonamedufus said…
Damn, I could have used this picture Thursday!
nonamedufus said…
Damn, I could have used this picture Thursday!
frankleemeidere said…
If it were brick, it would like like a Kingdom Hall.
nonamedufus said…
You know, you're right, Frank. There's one a little ways down the road from us here and the look is quite similar.
nonamedufus said…
It speaks for itself, doesn't it. Thanks Nora.
Cheryl said…
Y'know, dufus, this is probably the shot I love best today. It's a photo I wouldn't have taken because of those utility lines. You captured a moment that's simple yet elegant. The angle leads my eyes to the the people, then the left tower, and off to the clouds and the different trees. The utility lines don't detract one bit. In fact, they help draw me into the photo. Really stunning shot.

Fore!
nonamedufus said…
Thanks, Cheryl. Thank you very much. And who said you couldn't take neat pictures with an iPhone?
nonamedufus said…
Thanks, Cheryl. Thank you very much. And who said you couldn't take neat pictures with an iPhone?
Cheryl said…
Not I. I have a droid and can't shoot crap with it. I've seen some truly amazing iPhone photos. This counts.
nonamedufus said…
You know I use it more for other things; anything other than a phone!
nonamedufus said…
Wow. Guess how many comments I had for the 42 theme. Yeah, 42! Freaky.
MalisaHargrove said…
That is a really beautiful ordinary matter! The simplicity of the exterior draws me in. Did you go in? I want to go in!
Mike said…
The exterior doesn't give away what the interior holds. Great take Dufus.
I'm Catholic and would LOVE to attend a church like that. Gorgeous. Every time you go to a new church, you are supposed to make a wish. Wonder what it would be in a beautiful place like that.
nonamedufus said…
Thanks, Mike. I'm glad you liked both pics.
nonamedufus said…
A wish? Really? I never knew that. Glad you liked the pic.
nonamedufus said…
Oh, I went in. It was gorgeous. White walls, dark wooded pews, lovely ceramic-tiled floors.

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