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Bibliofile - December



I normally would have summed up my month's reads sooner but I spent 2 weeks in Panama in late December/early January. So like they say better late than never.

My monthly average dipped somewhat in December to 7 books. But add that to the 101 volumes I'd already read this year and the year-end total climbs to 108 books for 2013.

Highlights this month include finally getting to Outliers an interesting take on how success is achieved. Read it. I'm not going to give it away.

I also enjoyed Inside the Dream Palace, a somewhat historical overview of New York's Chelsea Hotel. The book makes it clear it's famous - or infamous perhaps - for more than the one night fling Leonard Cohen sings about having with Janis Joplin.

And I really enjoyed He Died With His Eyes Open by Derek Raymond. Raymond's name came up in another book I read this month by one of my all time favourites Ken Bruen.  Raymond is a nom de plume for British crime writer Robert William Arthur Cook, known by many as being a founder of British noir.

Here's a list of the books I read in December, in the order in which I read them.

Outliers - Malcolm Gladwell
Purgatory - Ken Bruen
The Gods of Guilt - Michael Connelly
Inside The Dream Palace - Sherill Tippins
He Died With His Eyes Open - Derek Raymond
The Neon Rain - James Lee Burke
Cockroaches - Jo Nesbo

I wonder how many books I'll read in 2014.

Comments

Cockroaches?


UGH.


I'm not sure I could muster up enough mojo to read any book with this title.


Heebeejeebies much?


UGH.


*smile*
nonamedufus said…
Cockroaches is the 2nd Harry Hole novel in a series by crime writer Jo Nesbo. While written in 1998 it was only just translated last year. I like to read stuff sequentially, so I had ti wait a bit for this to come out. Next #3, The Redbreast.
Bryan G. said…
I didn't even realize Cockroaches was out yet. We haven't gotten it yet at our library...well, now I know what I'll be letting our director know she can get. :) ...oh and I see you that you're reading them in the right order. I usually do but didn't know until I already had started and decided not to wait. Most of the time, though, I like to read series in order too and am quite a stickler about it otherwise.
nonamedufus said…
I'm like you, Bryan. I like to read series in sequential order. I read Cockroaches on my iPad, which I'm finding I'm reading most of my books these days.. Speaking of books coming out I was pleased to read the latest Ken Bruen book Purgatory. He's quickly become my favourite private detective novelist.
You put me to shame, Dufus! Even with my Kindle fired up and a week off after my surgery, I can't seem to get through that many books these days. I'm hardly even keeping up with my favorite blogs, (obviously.) *sigh*

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