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Bibliofile - Hell Toupee


So here I am in the middle of the month, instead of the end of the month, talking about books. One book actually. A kind woman got hold of me on Twitter and asked me if I'd like a review copy of something called Hell Toupee. With the number of books I buy a month I jumped at the chance of reading something for free. And that worked both ways. I wasn't payed for this review (hint, hint).

So we switched e-mails and I let her know my address. She told me it was by Mitch Friedman. I confess after I heard "Mitch" I was certain this was Mitch Albom's latest book. You know, the author of Tuesday's With Morry, The Five People You Meet in Heaven?

When I opened the package I had received I learned the book was by some guy called Friedman. Oh, well, I'll get to it after I finish the latest Dismas Hardy Detective novel The Fall.

This was nothing like that, although maybe in one way, that they were both about the search for truth. In the Dismas Hardy piece they searched for the murderer. Quelle surprise! In the Friedman book he searched for the cure to male pattern baldness. Sure. Similar, right?

Toupee is such  funny word. One of the funniest in the English language. And I was pleasantly surprised that Mitch Friedman was equally funny - and educational. In my early 60s, I'm still blessed with a full head of hair. You hear that Mitch? Poor Mitch took the unfortunate route of purchasing "The System" in his early 30s. And he put up with what for all intents and purposes looked like a wet dog for a full year. His tale is simply hilarious. I confess I chuckled, shook my head and laughed out loud at various spots. (See what I did there? Spots? Bald spots?)

Thoughout this tale he weaves (ha, ha I didn't even do that one on purposes) a humorous yet sad tale about his dysfunctional family. Think Augusten Burroughs pointedly sad but hilarious books and you'll get an idea of what I'm talking about.

On the whole, for a first book, I truly enjoyed reading Mitch Friedman's Hell Toupee. I can't wait to see what he writes about next.

Wanna learn more? Check out Mitch's website.

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