Skip to main content

The Final Act - @Studio30Plus Writing Prompt

This week the folks at Studio30Plus have taken a different approach to their writing prompt. Instead of a word or phrase they've used a picture to prompt participants. 




Jack sat on the the front porch of his farmhouse, which had seen better days. He gazed out down his dirt lane towards the highway, absently picking his nose, his old straw hat pulled forward to provide his face with some shade. He was used to this weather. Hot, dry, windy and not a lick of rain.

Last year he had been forced to sell his tractor and combine. He did not get a very good price for them. Indeed he didn't earn enough to pay off what he still owed on them. He had persevered the last few years, planting his crops in the fall in the hopes they'd sprout in the spring. But this ongoing drought for the last five years had taken it's toll. And not just out in the blighted and wind-swept fields.

Two years ago his wife had left him. One morning she'd packed a couple of bags, picked up the wee children and left in search of a better life. And so he'd spent the last few years alone having to contend with no crops, an empty barn and a house seriously in need of repairs he couldn't afford.

He'd about sold everything, including the kitchen appliances and rowboat. About all that remained was that damn motor scooter he'd bought for his wife on a whim, several years back before they had kids and before the onslaught of the drought. And, of course, the small gun he now held in his hands.


Comments

Dark, but I love it! Well done!
nonamedufus said…
It's where the prompt took me, Paula. Sometime it's light and other times not so much.
Tara R. said…
A bleak story, but all too real for so many small farmers.
nonamedufus said…
Sad but true isn't it.
nonamedufus said…
I think I read too much bleak fiction and am influenced in my writing.
Jayne said…
Bravo! Love it when I don't see an ending coming, but it was a perfectly organic fit for the piece. Really great stuff, Duf.
nonamedufus said…
Thanks, Jayne. It did work, didn't it.

Popular posts from this blog

My Back Pages - November

I know, I know, I know I should have reported in before now. But sometimes real life just gets in the way. I attempted 5 books in November. I say attempted because I slapped a big DNF (did not finish) on Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon. I just can't seem to get into this guy. It's the second or third of his I've given up on,

Not so the other four, starting with a biography of Stephen Stills called Change Partners. This followed by a hilarious biography of the guy responsible for National Lampoon called A Stupid and Futile Gesture - How Doug Kenney and National Lampoon Changed Comedy Forever.

I ended the month reading yet another biography, this one of the man behind Rolling Stone magazine,. It was called Sticky Fingers: The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone Magazine. A fascinating read.

So last month I hit the magic number 50 I'd imagined for myself back in January. If I roll this month into my yearly total I'm at 54 books. And I still have Decem…

Paroxysm Paradox

The weather was unseasonably warm for October. The sun set around 6:30 but the daylight hours were quite enjoyable. So thought Richard, as he set out for his daily walk in the woods. He marvelled at the turning leaves which exhibited an explosion of colour more significant with each passing day.

But Richard knew the turning leaves would soon start to fall. And the trees would soon be bare with no leaves at all. And then the snow would fly and fall from the trees as the leaves had before it.

Richard couldn't help but think of the sudden change to come as a seizure of sorts. And he wasn't looking forward to it. After all, who would welcome a seizure, he thought, as he rolled uncontrollably among the leaves.

This week paroxysm/seizure was the prompt at Two Word Tuesday.