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Biblofile - October/November



Illness prevented me from reporting on my reads from October so I'll use November's update to report on both.

I read four books in October. The Vinyl Dialogues by Mike Morsch is a collection of stories about some memorable albums - and some not so memorable - by the artists who made them. Interesting for music lovers such as myself. We Are As The Times Are was written by a friend of mine, Ken Rockburn, about Ottawa's well-known and highly regarded - and long-gone - coffee house Le Hibou where many Canadian and American folk acts hit the stage. An enjoyable read. Kenneth Anger wrote Hollywood Babylon a collection of salacious tales about the dark side of Hollywood. Fascinating reading. And I rounded out October with If He Hollars Let Him Go written by Chester Himes in 1945 which looks at racism in the United States. Sadly not a lot has changed in 2015.

I started November out with Further Adventures of a Grumpy Rock Star by Rick Wakeman, former keyboardist for Yes, Strawbs and other progressive rock collectives. This guy is extremely funny and his second volume of reminiscences didn't disappoint. I read the Girl in the Spider's Web by David Lagercrantz, the fourth book in the Stieg Larsson Millenial trilogy series. The effort was approved by Larsson's estate and it's an excellent read. Fifteen Dogs by Andre Alexis just won Canada's prestigious Giller Prize for best fiction and was pretty interesting. Dogs are given human voice and the novel centres around a collection of 15 dogs and how they cope. I ended the month with Dylan Goes Electric: Newport, Seeger, Dylan and the Night That Split the Sixties by Elija Wald. The interesting aspect about this book was it's historical take on the folk music scene leading up to Dylan and his music and that unforgettable appearance at 1965's Newport Folk Festival. I really enjoyed it.

Here are the books I read and their ratings:

The Vinyl Dialogues ***
We Are As The Times Are *****
Hollywood Babylon ****
If He Hollars Let him Go ****
Further Adventures of a Grumpy Old Rock Star ****
The Girl in the Spider's Web *****
Fifteen Dogs ****
Dylan Goes Electric ****

I've read 57 books this year. I'd estimated I'd probably read 75 books in 2015 but it doesn't look like that's going to happen. C'est la vie.

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