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Bibliofile - April


Well it was another fairly eclectic month on the reading front in April. Several novels from several of my favourite writers. A couple of music industry books. A behind the scenes movie-making book and a dud. That's right, a dud.

I'd read Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice in March and although it was a bit of a tough read it had it's moments so I thought I'd give his Gravity's Rainbow a go. Mistake. This was the most complicated and difficult novel I've ever undertaken. I lasted about 150 pages and then threw in the towel...and the book.

The latest Archer and Lehane efforts were excellent but then I buy nearly everything these two put out.

There were two highlights of the month. The first was As You Wish, a behind-the-scenes look at the making of The Princess Bride written by "Wesley" Cary Elwes. If you liked the movie then I find it inconceivable that you won't like this book.

I picked up Bill Buford's autobiography and was pleasantly surprised by the former drummer for Yes, Genesis and King Crimson's erudite and knowledgeable tale. Not only is he an accomplished musician and music historian as it were but the man is extremely well-read. This book was a real pleasure to read. Not your typical, or stereotypical rock and roll tale.

The other music book does it's best to prove the Beatles Revolver album was far more influential and timeless that Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The author makes some excellent points and it was an enjoyable read.

Here's the full list for April, seven books bringing my year's total to 24.

Gravity's Rainbow - Thomas Pynchon **
The Girl on the Train - Paula Hawkins ****
Mightier Than The Sword - The Clifton Chronicles Book 5 - Jeffrey Archer ****
World Gone By - Dennis Lehane ****
As You Wish - Inconceivable Tales from
The Making of The Princess Bride - Cary Elwes ****
Revolver - How The Beatles Reimagined Rock 'n'Roll - Robert Rodriguez ****
Bill Buford: The Autobiography - Bill Buford *****

I caught up with several TV series this month including the Borgias, wonderfully acted by Jeremy Irons, the wonderfully quirky Twin Peaks and the fabulous and thought-provoking Angels in America starring Al Pacino, Emma Thompson and Meryl Streep.

Comments

I think I'm on hold for The Girl on The Train at our library so maybe I'll get it sometime...next month or two. I've heard mixed things about it but I guess I'll read it because it's THE BOOK to read right now since everyone is talking about it.


I think Gravity's Rainbow, from what I've heard, is like the Ulysses of our generation so I don't blame you at all for not finishing. I finally took Ulysses off my bookshelf and sent it to our library booksale last year because I knew I'd never get to it, and I'm all right with that.
nonamedufus said…
I don't think I've ever had a DNF before, Bryan. This was a first. I really liked The Girl On The Train. I'd recommend it.

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