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He'd Confessed Everything - @Studio30Plus Writing Prompt


He wasn't an easy guy to track down. He was good at getting away, blending in, hiding. Like that time in 97 after the Bank of America heist. His accomplices were easy enough to find, one ofter the other. But the leader had easily slipped the flailing reach of the long arm of the law. Without a trace. It was like he had just evaporated, like he...well, you get the idea.

Thus it was a day for celebration in Precinct 79 when Captain Morganstern triumphantly paraded him from the squad car, through the Division and into Interview Room 5. Detectives and and beat cops alike knew the story. They'd heard about the elusive reprobate for years. He was almost an urban legend in the cop shop. And yet here he was in the flesh on the other end of Captain Morgenstern's handcuffs.

The interview took hours. Cigarette smoke, and the stench of stale coffee and body sweat seeped beneath the locked door. By the time all was said and done the sun had long since sunk low in the western sky. Morgenstern buzzed Commissioner Black to let him know the session had come to an end and the Commissioner said he'd be right down. He wanted to congratulate him in person.

But when Black arrived at Room 5 Morgenstern was alone with no sign of the inveterate criminal. The Commissioner's face said it all. He didn't even have to ask because Morgenstern knew exactly what he was thinking.

"We couldn't hold him" said Morgenstern, sheepishly. "It's not like he'd confessed everything."

Comments

Cheryl said…
Ha! Well played.
nonamedufus said…
Don't you just love a little twist at the end?
Katy B. said…
I love the word "reprobate." Great treatment of the prompt!
Thomas Marlowe said…
Can almost taste the frustration. Excellent.
Kir said…
well played, some people are just better at the "right to remain silent' than others. Great stuff!
nonamedufus said…
Thanks Thomas. I had fun with this prompt.
nonamedufus said…
Thanks, Katy, you reprobate. ;)
nonamedufus said…
I never thought of it that way. You're absolutely right.
ReformingGeek said…
Ah, shucks. I wanted him in the slammer!
Tara R. said…
Yes, frustrating. I really liked your word choices too, "reprobate," "inveterate criminal," and "flailing long arm of the law." Gave this a sort of 'pulp fiction' feel to it.
Joe said…
Ouch. That villain! Gone again. I like the interrogation spin on this prompt. Good job!
nonamedufus said…
Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed this one.

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